Jul. 22, 2015

Office Envy: CTA

by Marissa Lovell

High above downtown Boise lives a stimulating space conceptualized by CTA Architects Engineers, an integrated team of architects, designers, engineers and project managers. With live plants, 360-degree views and 100 percent employee input, CTA's space on the eighth floor of the Eighth & Main building has something for every style to envy.

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Sep. 4, 2015

A Place I Call Home

by Clark Krause

Yesterday, I celebrated five years with the Boise Valley Economic Partnership. I cannot thank this community and local business leadership enough for the opportunity to serve such a wonderful place. If you dare read on, please indulge me with a few reflections:

On my first visit to Boise, I arrived on a beautiful Fall Sunday night. I will never forget driving in from the airport and seeing the robotic Maytag Vista washing lady atop the building, passing the unexpected sign that pointed me to the Anne Frank Memorial, crossing over the pristine Boise River and looking down to see people, rafts and tubes afloat, only to look up and see the magnificent State Capitol building anchoring the downtown. 

On my own for dinner that evening, I was amazed how many folks were walking, riding bikes and dining on 8th Street. What was most unique/different/special was that it was not just downtown adults, but “downtown families”, many of them on bikes with dogs in tow. I sat outside on 8th Street with my pizza and soda that night and thought, ‘This is the best downtown experience I ever have had in a midsize city.’ I also looked admiringly toward the mountains, knowing that 16 miles from my downtown dining table there were chairlifts on top of the mountaintop with radio towers.

I thought that night, ‘If I ever had the opportunity, this is a place I would never regret making home to the Krause House.’ 

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Apr. 9, 2015

Office Envy: CSHQA

by Marissa Lovell

In 2013, CSHQA transformed an old railroad warehouse into a building inspired by an open, well-lit space to drive accessiblitly and teamwork. The symmetrical office is enclosed by three walls constructed almost entirely of windows. A creative, bold and incredibly sustainable design, CSHQA has revolutionized what it means to lead by example.

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Mar. 2, 2015

Office Envy: MetaGeek

by Marissa Lovell

The Owyhee building may be more than 100 years old, but the 5th floor home of MetaGeek brings a new type of energy to the historic plaza. The office buzzes with innovation and vitality, while maintaining a sense of tranquility. Artistic nooks, open spaces, a large kitchen stocked with snacks, beer on tap and a Ping-Pong table echo the company's value of fun. Inspired by casual creativity, the layout is built to encourage collaboration, inspiration and ingenuity.

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Dec. 18, 2015

Bogus Basin: Boise’s Year-Round Playground

by Marissa Lovell

Resting 16 miles above Boise’s core, Bogus Basin is an outdoor enthusiast's dream come true. Mountain bikers, trail runners, skiers and snowshoers flock to the easily accessible, all-season outdoor hub for their daily dose of Idaho mountain air.

Ever wondered what the history was behind Bogus Basin?

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Oct. 28, 2015

Harrison Boulevard Still Haunting Boise

by Erin McClure

Harrison Boulevard is one of Boise’s most ennobled streets, steeped in history and traditions that even its more recent inhabitants appreciate and honor. Despite all the effort that goes into one night, Harrison residents like Scott Petersen find themselves looking forward to the event every year.  “My favorite part of the night is seeing all the families in their theme costumes. One year there were these parents who carried their young daughter around and she was a cupcake and they were the bakers. There’s one boy who visits us every year and he always dresses as a pirate. You recognize faces over the years and watch kids grow up. And they are always so appreciative, telling us they love what we did with the house.”

The earliest reported tales of trick-or-treating on Harrison Boulevard originate in the 1930s. Former residents recall a scene that sounds all too familiar- costumed children being dropped off in large groups to descend upon homeowners in search of treats. Doris Cruzen, who lived on the boulevard in 1929, said “Halloween was always very big. We would see truckloads; I mean trucks larger than pickups, drive up and stop. Out would come maybe 25 children from one truck.” Jane Connor, another former resident, agreed, “There are times when I think I must have given out 500 pieces of candy. This is a great street for the little kids to be turned loose on. Their parents would let them out of the car, and they would go all the way around the street.” 

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Jan. 29, 2016

Boise Foothills: A Backyard, Not Just A Backdrop

by Erin McClure

My first introduction to the Boise Foothills was when my husband and I drove into the city the day it became our new home. We had visited twice before, but I hadn’t remembered seeing the hills. At least not the way they looked that day.

“What are those mountains?” I’d asked.  It was a clear, chilly day in mid-March with few clouds and lots of bright blue sky (quite common weather year-round, I later learned). The hills were mostly gold except where looming clouds scattered them with purple shadows. Coming from Georgia, I was thrilled to see snow dusting their peaks. My husband told me they were the Foothills. I admired how they seemed to protectively encircle the Capitol building, creating a stunning portrait of Boise that was hard to turn away from. “I can’t believe we live here,” I said. 

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Jan. 4, 2016

Ribbon of Jewels: Boise’s Women & Their Parks

by Erin McClure

The public park system running through the middle of Boise has been dubbed “String of Pearls”, and its nine riverside parks are known collectively as the “Ribbon of Jewels.” 

When Kathryn Albertson was asked by the Idaho Statesman in 1989 how it felt to have Boise’s newest park named after her, she lamented, “I didn’t want the Kathryn on there. It’s such a long name.” Her husband Joe Albertson, founder of the national Albertsons grocery store chain, decided to name the 41-acre park for his wife when someone pointed out how both Julia Davis and Ann Morrison Parks nearby were also named after women. “A hell of a good idea,” Joe said.

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Mar. 3, 2016

Profit & Purpose: Growing a company that aims to put a dent in the universe

by ​Jess Flynn

How do you define what motivates you, what gets you out of bed each morning? If you can sum it up in 140-characters you might be onto something. For Nathaniel Mueller, CEO of SaaSfocus, his one line bio pointedly states: "If anyone ever questions my purpose or intentions they are simple. I want to do interesting, compelling and meaningful things ALL the time."

Purpose and meaning are the alchemy that fuels Mueller. Spend just ten minutes with this Meridian-based global entrepreneur and that becomes clear. The ability to do meaningful work that can 'put a dent in the universe' is at the core of the start and rapid growth of his agile consulting, design and development company SaaSfocus. “We are trying to accomplish projects where we can implement meaningful change,” says Mueller. And that is his competitive advantage, at least when it comes down to the key battleground for growth - finding talent. 

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